Rosemary Garlic Olive Oil

April 1, 2012 § 4 Comments

Rosemary and Garlic infused Olive Oil is an easy to make seasoned oil that can be used for a variety of recipes, such as salads, roasted potatoes, and marinades.

I originally wanted to post a series of recipes that you could prepare for the Easter holiday gathering but time got away from me and I will only have time to post a few over the next week. To start, I am posting a recipe to make Rosemary Garlic Olive Oil. This week I will be posting the recipes for Rosemary and Garlic FocacciaSmashed Potatoes (using red and/or sweet potatoes), and Roasted Beets with Balsamic Glaze. Both recipes will utilize the Rosemary Garlic Oil.

NOTE: This oil can be made with any variety of fresh herbs, individually or in various combinations. Herbs that work well are – Thyme, Sage, and Rosemary.

1 cup Olive Oil
5 large cloves Garlic, whole with skins on
3 small sprigs Rosemary*

* If you need to wash the rosemary, be sure it is well dried before adding it to the hot oil because any water remaining on the leaves and stems will cause the oil to pop and splatter out of the pan.

Remove the leaves from two of the sprigs of Rosemary, reserving the hard stems separate from the leaves. Chop the leaves and set aside.

Heat olive oil in a stainless steel, heavy weight saucepan on medium to medium high heat. The oil should be hot but not smoking. Lower the heat to medium and carefully put the garlic, rosemary stems, and the whole rosemary sprig into the hot oil. Let the garlic and rosemary sizzle in the oil until garlic begins to turn a deep golden brown, about 3-5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.

Rosemary Garlic Olive Oil

Using a slotted spoon or tongs, remove garlic, rosemary stems and whole rosemary sprig. The rosemary stems can be discarded but set aside the garlic and rosemary sprig. While the oil is still hot, add chopped rosemary.  The oil should still be hot enough to make the rosemary sizzle. Let the oil cool in the pan. Store oil in a glass bottle or jar to be used later.

Roasted garlic and herbs from Rosemary Garlic Olive Oil

When the garlic is cool enough to handle, remove and discard the garlic skins. The roasted garlic meats can be stored in a container in the refrigerator for up to three days and used for another recipe – i.e. spread on bread, topped on Focaccia, mashed and used in a marinade or sauce, etc.

Roasted Garlic from Rosemary Garlic Olive Oil

The whole sprig of rosemary will be “crispy” when touched so the leaves will fall off the stem easily. They are actually very tasty nibbled on as is but they can be sprinkled on a dish as a finishing touch to add extra flavor. If you would like to keep these crispy, be sure to store them in an airtight container, away from moisture. They can be stored at room temperature for up to a week.

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF (minus photos to keep it on one page).

Rosemary Garlic Olive Oil.pdf

Corned Beef Hash

March 19, 2012 § 1 Comment

St. Patrick’s Day is over and now you are left with the dilemma of what to do with your leftover “Boiled Dinner.” Your answer – Homemade Corned Beef Hash.

I have to admit that every now and then I truly enjoy eating “canned” Corned Beef Hash but there really is no comparison to homemade. Hearty pieces of corned beef, sautéed with potatoes and onions, topped with fried or poached eggs is a breakfast that you can sit and savor. Don’t make it on a day you have to rush out the door. For a change, buy the paper, spread it out on the table and enjoy your breakfast as you do the crossword (and/or Sudoku) puzzle.

One piece of advice before you prepare this recipe – Don’t cut corners and try to use up those uneaten boiled potatoes. I’ve tried it and it just doesn’t work well and it often mashes into a pulpy mess. Use the leftover potatoes to make potato salad and prepare this recipe with a fresh Russet Potato.

Corned Beef Hash

1 Tbls. Vegetable Oil
½ cup Sweet Onion, diced
1 large Russet Potato, diced into ¼-inch cubes
¾ cup Water, separated
1 ½ cups Leftover cooked Corned Beef, diced
2 tsp. Sweet Paprika
Black Pepper

Serve with eggs prepared to your personal preference – poached, fried, over-easy, or scrambled.

NOTE: I recommend using a non-stick frying pan for this recipe because the potatoes tend to stick to a stainless steel pan. It is certainly not required, I just find it much easier to clean and the potato pieces tend to stay whole.

In a frying pan, heat oil on medium-high heat. Add onion and sauté until edges begin to brown. Add potato to the onions and continue to sauté until potatoes begin to turn translucent (they are more opaque when raw). Add ¼ cup water, lower heat to medium, and cook covered for 3 minutes.

Remove lid and continue to sauté onion-potato mixture. Add corned beef and paprika. Sauté for 30 seconds until everything is incorporated evenly. Add ½ cup water and continue to sauté until water is absorbed but the mixture is not dry. Season with black pepper and serve with eggs.

Corned Beef Hash - skillet

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF (minus photos to keep it on one page).

Corned Beef Hash.pdf

Chocolate Mint Cake in a Jar

March 14, 2012 § Leave a comment

Our clocks have sprung forward, the weather is warming up, crocuses have popped out of the ground, and St. Patrick’s Day is just a few days away. To help usher in the beautiful shades of green that comes with Spring, I’m posting this recipe for Chocolate Mint Cake in a Jar.

I recently came across an article online, “15 Dessert Recipes in a Jar – Cakes, cupcakes, brownies, and more by Andrea Roxas” and became fascinated with the concept of eating a decadent dessert out of a jar. I find this simple concept so much fun! It reminds me of when I was a Girl Scout and we made Frito Tacos and ate them around the campfire (taco meat filling, chopped lettuce and tomatoes, stuffed into individual serving size bag of Fritos).

We’ll see where this goes but to start, here is my first entry of “Food in a Jar”…

Chocolate Mint Cake in a Jar

8 – 8 oz. (half pint) glass Bell jars
Pam Canola Oil Cooking Spray

FOR CAKE:

½ cup Cocoa Powder
2 tsp. instant espresso or instant coffee
1 cup Water, boiling
2 tsp. Vanilla Extract
1 ¼ cups Flour
½ tsp. Baking Powder
½ tsp. Baking Soda
12 Tbls. (1 ½ sticks) Butter*, softened
1 ¼ cups Sugar
2 Eggs

MINT TOPPING:

1 cup Confectioner’s Sugar, sifted to remove lumps
2 Tbls. Butter, melted
1 Tbls. Milk
½ tsp. Vanilla Extract
2 tsp. Peppermint Extract
2-3 drops Green Food Coloring

CHOCOLATE TOPPING

1 cup Semisweet or Dark Chocolate
2 Tbls. Butter
2 Tbls. Milk
½ tsp. Peppermint Extract

* I use salted sweet cream butter. If you use unsalted butter add ¼ tsp. salt to this recipe

In a bowl, combine cocoa powder, instant coffee, boiling water, and vanilla extract.  Mix until smooth. Cool to room temperature.

Preheat oven to 350°. Spray the inside of the jars with cooking spray. Set aside. In a small bowl combine flour, baking powder, and baking soda.  Set aside.

In a large bowl beat butter with an electric mixer until smooth and shiny, about 1 minute. Add sugar and beat for 3 minutes. Add eggs, beating until well combined. Add 1/3 of flour mixture and beat until combined.  Add 1/3 cocoa mixture and beat until combined. Continue to add flour and cocoa alternately until everything is incorporated.

Pour ½ cup of batter into each jar. Place jars onto an oven safe tray and place in center of preheated oven. Bake for 17 minutes. Cakes are done when a long needle inserted in center comes out clean. Toppings can be added while cakes are warm but not hot.

NOTE: The cakes will rise to the top but shrink down to three-fourths the height of the jar. When the cakes cool they pull away from the glass, so the toppings will drip down the sides as opposed to forming a flat layer of frosting on top of cakes.

TO MAKE MINT TOPPING: In a bowl combine confectioners sugar, melted butter, milk, vanilla and peppermint extracts, and green food coloring. Divide mint topping among jars and pat sides of jar to help spread mint topping onto cakes.

TO MAKE CHOCOLATE TOPPING: In a microwave safe bowl, combine chocolate, butter, milk, and peppermint extract. Heat on high for 1 minute. Remove and whisk until smooth. If the chocolate is not melted through, continue to heat for 15 second intervals, stirring in between, until mixture is smooth. Distribute chocolate evenly among jars on top of Mint Topping, tapping sides to help spread evenly.

Cakes can be served as is or cover with lids to save (3 days at room temp or 5 days in the refrigerator).

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF.

Happy Birthday OREO!

March 7, 2012 § 2 Comments

I’m nearly belated because I’m posting this rather late in the evening of March 6th but I had to do a special post to recognize the great OREO’s 100th Birthday! In honor of its centennial I am posting two recipes, one simple and one that takes a little more work but both I feel exemplify the sweet goodness of what you can do with this delectable cookie.

There are so many ways you can eat an OREO cookie – crushed into a pastry crust, crumbled on top of a sundae, whipped into a smooth cold concoction, or even deep fried (yes, really, Google it and you’ll find a plethora of recipes and how to videos). But nothing really compares to eating an OREO in the best, simplest form…straight up with a glass of cold milk.

Because of this momentous occasion I decided to create a category “The Great OREO” and add recipes that utilize the OREO throughout the year.

OREO Rice Krispie Treats

2 cups Rice Krispies
1 cup (approx. 10) OREO Cookies, broken into ¼ to ½ inch pieces
¼ cup Pretzels, broken into ¼ inch pieces
¼ cup Mini Chocolate Chips or Mini M&Ms *
2 Tbls. Butter
2 ½ cups Mini Marshmallows

* NOTE: Chocolate chips and M&Ms will melt when mixed with the marshmallow. Some pieces will stay whole but most will melt and the M&M candy shell will crumble and become flecks of color throughout the bars. If you prefer not to have the melted bits throughout the bars you could melt chocolate chips and drizzle thin stripes on top of bars. Be sure the chocolate is set before cutting.

Prepare an 8×8 pan by rubbing bottom and sides with butter.

NOTE: A silicone spoon rubbed with butter works great with marshmallow!

In a bowl, combine Rice Krispies, OREOs, pretzel, and mini chocolate chips or mini M&Ms. Set aside.

Place butter and marshmallows in a large microwave safe bowl. Microwave on high heat for 1 minute. Stir marshmallow and microwave for an additional 15-30 seconds until mixture is melted (continue heating at 15 second intervals if not completely melted).

Add Rice Krispie mixture to marshmallow and stir until combined well. Press mixture into the prepared 8×8 pan and let set for about 1 hour (can place in fridge to make it set faster). Cut into squares.

Makes 16 – 2”x2” squares. This recipe can be doubled if you want to make a 9”x12” pan.

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF.

OREO Rice Krispie Treats.pdf

Turtle Cheesecake Bites

10 OREO Cookies, finely crushed (about ¾ cup)
2 Tbls. Butter, melted
12 Caramels (for this recipe I used KRAFT caramel squares)
2 Tbls. Milk
1/3 cup Pecans, toasted and chopped
1 – 8 oz pkg. Cream Cheese, softened
¼ cup Sugar
1 tsp. Vanilla Extract
1 Egg
¼ cup Chocolate Chips

NOTE: When melting caramels use a bowl about three times the size of the ingredients because the milk will bubble up when heating.

Preheat oven to 325°. Place mini cupcake liners into mini cupcake pan.

Mix OREO Cookie crumbs with melted butter.  Distribute mixture among 24 mini cupcake liners. Press crumbs into bottom of cupcake liners.

Place caramels and milk in a microwave safe bowl.  Heat on high for 1 minute. Stir caramel to make sure it is melted evenly.  If it needs additional melting, heat for 15 second intervals, stirring between. Add pecans and mix until combined evenly.

Using half of the caramel-pecan mixture, place about a half-teaspoon on top of OREO crumbs inside each cupcake liner. Cover the remaining half with plastic wrap to use later.

Using an electric mixer, beat cream cheese, sugar, and vanilla on medium speed for 1 full minute. Add the egg and mix on low until just blended. Distribute mix evenly among cupcake cups. Bake for 12-15 minutes (center may split but they should not be browned).

After cheesecakes are cooled off, microwave reserved caramel-pecan mixture and distribute evenly among cupcakes. Next, place chocolate chips into ziplock bag. Heat with the bag open on high for 30 seconds. Knead bag gently. If chocolate needs to be melted more continue to heat and knead for 15 second intervals. When chocolate is melted smooth, zip close bag pushing out most of the air. Cut the tip of one of the bottom corners and squeeze bag to pipe chocolate drizzle onto cheesecakes.

Makes 24 mini cheesecakes.

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF (minus photos to keep it on one page).

OREO Turtle Cheesecake Bites.pdf

Chocolate Braised Beef Short Ribs

February 19, 2012 § Leave a comment

My nephew once said to me, “I don’t think you’re a Chocoholic…after all a ‘–holic’ is someone with a ‘problem’. You’re more of a…Chocolatarian…chocolate is your way of life.”

For most people, what generally comes to mind when people think about chocolate are images of truffles, steaming cups of hot cocoa, decadent cakes, and warm chocolate chip cookies. But familiar to any true Chocolotarian who has researched the origins of chocolate, it was a not always a sweet confection. The use of the cocoa bean for consumption can be dated back to 1900 BCE but it wasn’t until the 1500s that Europeans added sugar and honey to cocoa and evolved it into to the sweet treat we enjoy today.

I’ve always been intrigued with how chocolate could be used to prepare savory dishes. What I found most common was using cocoa to make Mole, which in itself is deceiving because it is a single word used for a broad array of sauces, many not using chocolate at all. But this blog post is not about Mole but using chocolate in a savory dish. The following recipe combines many of the most common spices used in Mole but adapted to work in a braised dish. The spices are combined to create a dry rub which becomes infused into the dish during the long braising time.

NOTE: I recently tried this recipe using lean stew meat and was very disappointed at the results. The dish lacked the hearty beef flavor that short ribs provide. The beef was dry, did not meld well with the herbs, and the overall flavor was surprisingly tart. There was relatively little fat to skim before serving but for this recipe stick with the fattier full flavor of the short ribs.

Chocolate Braised Beef Short Ribs (GF)

This recipe is inspired by Mole but instead of making a sauce, similar herbs are used as a dry rub. Despite the strong complex flavors of the various seasonings in this recipe, they meld together and are enhanced by the hearty flavor of the beef short ribs.

1 Tbls. Sesame Seeds, toasted and ground
2 Tbls. Cocoa Powder, unsweetened
2 Tbls. Penzey’s Chili Powder, regular [1]
1/4 tsp. Cinnamon
1/4 tsp. Coriander
1/8 tsp. Cloves
1/4 tsp. Salt and Pepper
2 Tbls. Oil, vegetable
2 slices Bacon, thick cut [2]
5 lb. Beef Short Ribs
1 Tbls. Turbinado Sugar (white or brown sugar can be substituted)
2 Shallots, sliced
2 stalks Celery, chopped
1 cup Carrots, chopped
1 28 oz. can Tomato, diced (Recommend San Marzano type.)
1 1/2 cups Cabernet Wine
1 1/2 cups Beef Broth

In a small bowl, combine sesame seeds, cocoa powder, Penzey’s chili powder, cinnamon, coriander, cloves, salt, and pepper. Rub the herb mixture onto the beef short ribs being sure to coat all surfaces well.

Preheat oven to 325°. Heat oil in a Dutch Oven or heavy stove-to-oven-safe pan. Brown bacon, being sure not to over cook (bacon should be brown and crisp but not hard or burnt). Set bacon aside and chop into ¾-inch pieces.

In the same pan, brown beef short ribs on medium-high heat but be careful not to burn the ribs or pan. After browned, lower heat to medium and sprinkle turbinado sugar onto ribs, being sure to get a little on each rib. Let sit for 1 minute to let sugar melt into meat. Remove ribs and set aside.

In the same pan, sauté shallots, celery, and carrots until vegetables look lightly glazed, about 3 minutes.

Return beef short ribs and bacon to pan.  Add tomatoes, Cabernet wine, and beef broth. Bring to a boil. Cover and place pan in the center of oven. Braise for 3 hours, checking around the 2 hour mark to see if it needs more liquid. If needed, add more beef broth.

Before serving, skim fat off of top or you can make this dish a day ahead, refrigerate and remove solidified fat prior to reheating.

SERVING RECOMMENDATIONS: Serve over mashed potatoes or a smooth Polenta. The ribs have a very robust flavor so this dish generally goes best with a bland starch accompaniment.

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF (minus photos to keep it on one page).

Chocolate Braised Beef Short Ribs (GF).pdf

* Gluten allergy and intolerance has become increasingly common.  I will not go into detail about the specific symptoms, causes, or differences but I will note beside the recipe titles “(GF)” for those recipes that are gluten free.  Please note that although I have labeled these recipes to be gluten free you must do your due diligence to review ingredient labels of prepared products to verify that they are truly gluten free. Also consider the side you choose to serve. In some recipes I recommend pasta or bread, which in most cases are not gluten free.


[1] I specifically used Penzey’s brand of Chili Powder because of its blend of Ancho Chili pepper, cumin, garlic, and Mexican Oregano.

[2] I recommend Wellshire Farm’s Black Forest Bacon. Remember the type and flavoring in the bacon will effect your dish. For example, if you choose a maple or heavily smoked flavored bacon it will have a significant impact on the overall flavor, which may not be bad, just an element to consider.

Three Rose Marinade (for Lamb Chops or Cornish Hen)

February 15, 2012 § Leave a comment

Roses for Valentine’s Day is wonderful but even better if you can eat them. Well, not really eat them because you just don’t know what has been sprayed on them. So instead I offer a recipe using rosemary, rose peppercorns, and rose water.

This is a recipe I developed quite a while ago when I first saw the movie, Like Water for Chocolate. As I sat there in the dark movie theater, the cooking-nerd in me thought, “Wow! Can you really cook with roses?” For those who have seen the movie, you can probably guess which scene inspired my culinary creativity . For those who have not seen the movie I’ll just say that I hope this recipe will invoke feelings of pleasure and excitement…

NOTE: Updated this page on March 8th – corrected typo in PDF and added two photos of Cornish Hen.

Three Rose Marinade (for Lamb Chops or Cornish Hen)

If using lamb rib chops, slice each steak with two ribs so the meat is about 1 ¼ to 1 ½ inches thick.  This will help keep the chops medium to medium rare. Lamb Kidney Chops (looks like a mini T-bone steak) are generally sliced thick. This marinade also works well with Cornish Hens. Split each hen in half (neck to tail).

1 ¼ to 2 lb Lamb Rib or Kidney Chops or 2 Cornish Hens, split
2 Garlic Cloves, chopped
2 tsp. Brown Sugar
1 tsp. Rosemary, fresh chopped
½ tsp. Rose Peppercorns, ground
dash Cloves, ground
¼ tsp. Salt
2 Tbls. Balsamic Vinegar
¼ cup Port (or Red Wine)
2 Tbls. Rose Water
¼ cup Olive Oil

Combine garlic, brown sugar, rosemary, rose peppercorns, cloves, salt, balsamic vinegar, Port, rose water, and olive oil. Mix with a fork or whisk until sugar is dissolved. Add to meat and marinate at least 30 minutes and up to overnight.

IF PREPARING LAMB: Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a grill pan. Sear chops on each side for about 4 minutes on medium-high heat. Alternately, chops can be cooked on an outdoor grill or broiled in the oven.

IF PREPARING CORNISH HENS: Bake hens in a preheated 350° oven for 35 minutes, basting once about 20 minutes into cooking. Alternately, the hens can be prepared on an outdoor grill. Sear skin side first, then cook bone side down at medium heat if using a gas grill or indirect heat if using coal or wood.

SERVING RECOMMENDATIONS: This recipe pairs well with roasted potatoes or rice pilaf.

SALAD RECOMMENDATION: Arugula Salad – mix baby arugula, radicchio, and Belgium endive. Top with slices of ripe but firm pear and slivers of red onion. For dressing drizzle one part Sour Pomegranate Syrup and two parts Greek (Kalamata) olive oil or one part fresh lemon juice and two parts Greek (Kalamata) olive oil. Sprinkle with fresh ground salt and pepper.

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF (minus photos to keep it on one page).

Three Rose Marinade (for Lamb or Cornish Hen) (GF).pdf

* Gluten allergy and intolerance has become increasingly common.  I will not go into detail about the specific symptoms, causes, or differences but I will note beside the recipe titles “(GF)” for those recipes that are gluten free.  Please note that although I have labeled these recipes to be gluten free you must do your due diligence to review ingredient labels of prepared products to verify that they are truly gluten free. Also consider the side you choose to serve. In some recipes I recommend pasta or bread, which in most cases are not gluten free.

Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Tarragon (GF) and Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Lemon Rosemary and Thyme

February 5, 2012 § 1 Comment

Butter vs. Olive Oil – Casserole-Roasted Chicken

When I was young I was equally fascinated watching Julia Child as much as Sesame Street on PBS. It was the beginning of my fascination with cooking in the French style. If you have ever prepared any of Julia Child’s recipes you will see 2 common ingredients: lardons (fatty bacon) and butter. She also lived to be 91 so I have no comment about the health implications of such a diet. But many of us can only consume so much butter and pork fat on a day-to-day basis.

This post is not about the health benefits of cooking with one fat verses another. It is simply an experiment to compare the culinary results of using butter versus olive oil to prepare a casserole-roasted chicken. A chicken cooked in this fashion is tender and succulent, with a delicate aromatic flavor, but sometimes you just want an alternative to using a stick of butter.

Putting aside flavor, a significant difference between cooking with butter versus olive oil is the smoking temperature. This is the temperature at which the cooking oil will break down and produce an acrid smoke. For butter, that temperature is 300 degrees, where as olive oil has a much higher threshold of 375 degrees.

What this signifies is that butter, while less tolerant to high heat, will also brown what you are cooking more quickly. The following photo is an example of the browning results between the two oils.

Left: Chicken seared in butter     Right: Chicken seared in olive oil.

As for the flavor and consistency of preparing the chicken in butter versus olive oil, both chickens came out equally tender and succulent but obviously projected the unique flavor attributes of the cooking fat. The chicken roasted with butter has a rich, almost creamy-smooth texture and flavor. The olive oil roasted chicken also has a rich quality and smooth texture but not the same creaminess as the butter roasted chicken.

Below are two recipes, Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Tarragon, which requires butter and Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Lemon Rosemary and Thyme, which requires olive oil.  I opted to post two separate recipes instead of using a single recipe prepared separately using the two oils because I felt the flavor of butter melded better with tarragon and olive oil was enhanced with Mediterranean seasoning.  I wouldn’t place one recipe superior to the other but try it for yourself to compare…

Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Tarragon – butter recipe

This recipe is inspired by Julia Child’s Poulet Poêle À L’Estragon. (Sorry Julia, I do not truss my chicken for my Tarragon Chicken recipe). I have followed her recipe exactly and I do admit that the breast meat of the chicken is a bit juicier when the bird is trussed. Also, if you would like to serve your chicken intact you will need to truss the bird and increase the cooking time in this recipe by approximately 10 minutes. If you do not truss the chicken, as I do in this recipe, the legs will fall loose when you pick it up out of the pan. I prefer to carve the bird prior to serving so it’s not important to me to have the bird in one piece. For personal taste I add garlic and increased the vegetables used in this recipe.

1 whole 3-5 lb Roasting Chicken
4 Tbls. Butter, separated
1 tsp. Tarragon, dried (2 tsp. chopped fresh)
Salt and Pepper
1 Tbls. Vegetable Oil
1 cup Sweet Onion, diced
1 – 8 oz. bag (½ lb) Baby Carrots or sliced regular carrots
5 cloves garlic, whole with skins on
½ tsp. Tarragon, dried (1 tsp. chopped fresh)
1 cup Chicken Broth
½ Tbls. Cornstarch
1 Tbls. Marsala
¼ tsp. Tarragon (½ tsp. chopped fresh)

Brush 2 tablespoons melted butter on the outside and inside of the chicken. Then sprinkle the tarragon, salt and pepper on the outside and inside of the chicken.

Preheat oven to 325°. Melt 2 tablespoons butter and vegetable oil in a Dutch Oven or heavy stove-to-oven-safe pan. Brown the chicken on all sides, starting with the breast side first. Remove chicken to a platter.

In the same pan, sauté onions, carrots, garlic, and ½ teaspoon tarragon for 3-5 minutes. Return the chicken to the pan, breast side up. Using a bulb baster, baste the chicken with the liquid in the pan, squirting juice into the chicken cavity as a last step. Cover chicken with a piece of aluminum foil, then cover with the pan lid. Bake 35 minutes for a 3 lb chicken, 45 minutes for a 5 lb chicken. The chicken is done when the drumstick moves in their sockets.

NOTE: The length of time to cook will vary based on the type of pan or dish you are using. The time I recommend is based on using a heavy non-stick cast iron pan. Julia Child recommends 1 hour 10 minutes for a chicken weighing 3 lb and 1 hour 30 minutes for a 5 pounder, which I found to be too long. Her lengthier time is probably due to her chicken being trussed and the recipe was written in 1961, when it was more common to cook poultry well-done.

Remove chicken to a platter. Skim off excess oil in pan. Remove garlic to a small plate. Remove the garlic skins and using the tines of a fork, mash garlic into a paste. Return garlic paste to the pan and stir into juices. Add chicken broth to pan and bring the mixture to a boil on the stovetop. Combine cornstarch and Marsala in a small bowl. Stir cornstarch mixture into pan, mixing well to prevent lumpiness. Add ¼ teaspoon tarragon and simmer for 3 minutes to let herb flavor meld into sauce. (See recipe below for Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Lemon Rosemary and Thyme for images of making garlic paste and sauce)

SERVING RECOMMENDATIONS: Carve chicken per your own preference and pour sauce and vegetables over chicken. This recipe is great with roasted or mashed potatoes or rice pilaf.

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF (minus photos to keep it on one page).

Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Tarragon.pdf

Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Lemon Rosemary and Thyme – olive oil recipe

This recipe is prepared identically to my recipe for Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Tarragon, which was inspired by Julia Child’s Poulet Poêle À L’Estragon. But I wanted to experiment using olive oil instead of butter, which compelled me to use Mediterranean herbs.

1 whole 3-5 lb Roasting Chicken
½ Lemon
1 tsp. Rosemary, fresh
1 tsp. Thyme, fresh
Salt and Pepper
1 Tbls. Honey
2 Tbls. Sherry
5 Tbls. Olive Oil, separated
5 cloves garlic, whole with skins on
1 cup Chicken Broth
½ Tbls. Cornstarch
1 Tbls. Sherry

Squeeze out the juice of half a lemon into a small bowl and set aside. Rub the chicken skin and inside of the cavity with the remaining lemon skin/rind. In the bowl of lemon juice, add honey, sherry and 2 tablespoons olive oil.  Brush the mixture outside and inside of the chicken. Sprinkle the rosemary, thyme, salt, and pepper outside and inside of the chicken.

Preheat oven to 325°. Heat 3 tablespoons olive oil in a Dutch Oven or heavy stove-to-oven-safe pan. Brown the chicken on all sides, starting with the breast side first. Add garlic. Cover chicken with a piece of aluminum foil, then cover with pan lid. Bake – 35 minutes for a 3 pound chicken, 45 minutes for a 5 pound chicken. The chicken is done when the drumstick moves in their sockets.

NOTE: The length of time to cook will vary based on the type of pan or dish you are using. The time I recommend is based on using a heavy non-stick cast iron pan. Julia Child recommends 1 hour 10 minutes for a chicken weighing 3 lb and 1 hour 30 minutes for a 5 pounder, which I found to be too long. Her lengthier time is probably due to her chicken being trussed and the recipe was written in 1961, when it was more common to cook poultry well-done.

Remove chicken to a platter. Skim off excess oil in pan. Remove garlic to a small plate. Remove the garlic skins and using the tines of a fork, mash garlic into a paste. Return garlic paste to the pan and stir into juices. Add chicken broth to pan and bring the mixture to a boil on the stovetop. Combine cornstarch and Sherry in a small bowl. Stir cornstarch mixture into pan, mixing well to prevent lumpiness. Add a pinch of fresh rosemary and thyme to sauce.

SERVING RECOMMENDATIONS: Carve chicken per your own preference and pour sauce over chicken. This recipe is great with roasted or mashed potatoes, egg noodles, or rice pilaf.

For those of you who are like me and like to have an old fashion printed copy of recipes, the below link is to a PDF (minus photos to keep it on one page).

Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Lemon Rosemary and Thyme.pdf

* Gluten allergy and intolerance has become increasingly common.  I will not go into detail about the specific symptoms, causes, or differences but I will note beside the recipe titles “(GF)” for those recipes that are gluten free.  Please note that although I have labeled these recipes to be gluten free you must do diligence to review ingredient labels of prepared products to verify that they are truly gluten free. Also consider the side you choose to serve. In some recipes I recommend pasta or bread, which in most cases are not gluten free.

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